REEEC Faculty Achievements

The Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center is very proud to share the recent accomplishments of its faculty affiliates!

Donna Buchanan

Donna Buchanan

Donna Buchanan was an invited speaker at the First International Kaval Symposium (Istanbul Technical University, 20-21 February 2014), where she gave a paper entitled “Bulgarian Acoustemological Tales: Narrativity, Ecology, and the Kaval’s Voice.” She also presented two guest lectures on Turkish musical instruments and, with the Balkanalia music ensemble, directed two mini-concerts for the guitar classes at Champaign’s Centennial High School in February and March.

Prof. Jessica Greenberg

Prof. Jessica Greenberg

Jessica Greenberg (Assistant Professor of Anthropology) is the author of a forthcoming book, After the Revolution: Youth, Democracy, and the Politics of Disappointment in Serbia. It documents the lives of student activists who helped oust the dictator Slobodan Milosevic from power in 2000, but then faced problems creating democracy in the new Serbia. How do they transfer their revolutionary energy to the slow work of building democratic institutions? To view more information about the book, please see http://www.sup.org/book.cgi?id=21682.

Sound, Speech, Music in Soviet and Post-Soviet Cinema (2014)

Sound, Speech, Music in Soviet and Post-Soviet Cinema (2014)

Lilya Kaganovsky (Associate Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and Comparative and World Literature) edited a new volume entitled Sound, Speech, Music in Soviet and Post-Soviet Cinema with Masha Salazkina. This innovative volume challenges the ways we look at both cinema and cultural history by shifting the focus from the centrality of the visual and the literary toward the recognition of acoustic culture as formative of the Soviet and post-Soviet experience. Leading experts and emerging scholars from film studies, musicology, music theory, history, and cultural studies examine the importance of sound in Russian, Soviet, and post-Soviet cinema from a wide range of interdisciplinary perspectives. Addressing the little-known theoretical and artistic experimentation with sound in Soviet cinema, changing practices of voice delivery and translation, and issues of aesthetic ideology and music theory, this book explores the cultural and historical factors that influenced the use of voice, music, and sound on Soviet and post-Soviet screens. For more information about the book, please see http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/catalog/807042.

Prof. Stefanos Katsikas

Prof. Stefanos Katsikas

Stefanos Katsikas, Director of the Modern Greek Studies and Language Coordinator of Modern Greek at Illinois, and a REEEC faculty affiliate, contributed a chapter entitled “Transitional Justice after the Collapse of Dictatorship in Greece (1974-2000)” to the recently published volume Transitional Justice and Memory in Europe (1945-2013), ed. Nico Wouters. Since the topic of transitional justice has not been widely addressed in historical scholarship, the book’s nine case studies address transitional justice in various European countries and contexts. The contributors examine the questions “What lessons can we learn from history, and more importantly: how?” For more information about the book, please click here.

Diane Koenker contributed a couple of news items in connection with the Sochi Winter Olympic Games published a short essay for the Foreign Affairs online edition on February 23, 2014: “Sochi in the Russian Imagination: Dreaming of Health and Greatness, from Stalin to Putin.” The essay can be viewed at http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/140961/diane-p-koenker/sochi-in-the-russian-imagination.

Harriet Murav (Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and Comparative and World Literature; Editor of Slavic Review) has been awarded the National Yiddish Book Center Translation Fellowship, together with Sasha Senderovich (University of Colorado at Boulder), to translate David Bergelson’s 1929 Yiddish novella MIDES HADIN (Strict Justice). She is also the co-editor with Gennady Estraikh of Soviet Jews: Fighting, Witnessing, Remembering, forthcoming from Academic Studies Press.

In February, Marek Sroka (Interim Head of the History, Philosophy, and Newspaper Library) presented the paper “The Use of Library Video Tutorials and YouTube as Educational and Promotional Tools about Historical Newspapers” at the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) International Newspapers Conference in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Prof. Richard Tempest

Prof. Richard Tempest

Richard Tempest (Associate Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures) had three book chapters published in 2013: “Yeltsin and Putin: A Study in Comparative Mythopoetics” in the volume Political Marketing: Strategic “Campaign Culture,ed. Kostas Gouliamos et al.; “Fermopily Georgiia Vorotyntseva: Solzhenitsynskaia kontseptsiia muzhestvennosti” in Zhizn’ i tvorchestvo Aleksandra Solzhenitsyna: Na puti k Krasnomu Kolesu, ed. Liudmila Saraskina; and “Esteticheskaia tainopis’ Solzhenitsyna: ‘Odin den’ Ivana Denisovicha’ kak rod khydozhestvennoi meditatsii” in Mezhdunarodnaia nauchnaia konferentsiia “Ivanu Denisovichu – polevka,” ed. Irina Melentieva. He also had two articles published: “‘War is Existence Itself’: Representations of the Authorial Self in Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s Story “Zhelyabuga Village” in Filologicheskie nauki, no. 2; and “Voennyi palimpsest: lichnost’ marshala Zhukova v interpretatsii Aleksandra Solzhenitsyna” in Vestnik Riazanskogo Gosudarstvennogo Universiteta, no. 3. Additionally, he has given the following papers and invited talks: “Aleksei Navalny and the Return of Politics in Russia” at the Political Communication Forum in the Budapest College of Business, Communication, and the Arts on July 24, 2013; and “Despots and Democrats: Charismatic Leadership in the Modern World” (8 Lectures on World Politics) for the Osher Life Long Learning Institute in Champaign, Illinois, in spring 2013.

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