Summer Research Lab 2015

From 15 June-8 August, 2015 the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will conduct the annual Summer Research Laboratory (SRL). The SRL is open to all scholars, including graduate

At the Slavic Reference Service: Dr. Uryadova with Dr. Dmitry Tartakovsky, Visiting South Slavic Specialist

At the Slavic Reference Service: Dr. Uryadova with Dr. Dmitry Tartakovsky, Visiting South Slavic Specialist

students, with research interests in the Russian, East European and Eurasian region. Scholars are provided access to the resources of the University of Illinois Slavic collection and the opportunity to seek advice and research support from the librarians of the Slavic Reference Service (SRS). With generous support and funding from the Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center, SRS was able to add new acquisitions to the library’s holdings which will be available to this year’s applicants to consider in their research.

The updated resources available to applicants are listed below by subject.

Anthropology:

  • Significant print holdings, including noted scholar Demitri Shimkin’s archival papers and materials on anthropology;
  • Full-text access to Central and Eastern European Online Library’s collection of humanities and social sciences journals (1,156 journals); and
  • Some of the most complete holdings of Russian, East European, and Eurasian anthropological journals in the U.S. including searchable full text of leading anthropological journals such as Etnograficheskoe obozrenie and Rossiiskaia arkheologiia back to 2000.

Balkan Studies, Turkish/Ottoman Studies:

  • Yugoslavia: Peoples, States, and Society (microfilm collection) consists of 109 reels, which includes a unique set of short monographs, pamphlets, and other materials on the Balkan Wars, World War I and the South Slavs, interwar Yugoslavia, and World War II;
  • Russian-Ottoman Relations, 1600-1914. Part 1: The Origins, 1600-1800 (microfilm collection) contains approximately 193 titles on Russian-Ottoman relations: diplomatic treaties, travel reports, decrees, eye-witness accounts of military campaigns, and policy deliberations;
  • Yugoslav statistics 1834-1919 microfilm collection contains well over 300 annuals, serials, censuses and other publications from Croatia, Serbia, Montenegro, and Bosnia published between 1834 and 1919. Moreover, 12 institutions from the former Yugoslavia, Austria, the United States and Britain have contributed to this unique collection;
  • Unlimited access to some of the most complete holdings of journals in the U.S; and
  • Russo-Turkish War 1877-1878 microfilm collection consists of 120 reels and includes military and civilian documents from the Russian State Military History Archive.

Political Science:

  • Full text access to Ukrainian Publications Database, which includes national bibliographic publication and journals;
  • Access to ISI Emerging Markets;
  • online access to major national bibliographic publications, including the most extensive and most current holdings of Uzbek national bibliographic publications in North America;
  • Full text access to Commonwealth of Independent States and Baltic Periodicals Database (19 titles);
  • Full text access to Newspapers of the North Caucasus, Abkhazia and South Ossetia (20 titles);
  • Full text access to Pravda Digital Archive (1912-2009);
  • Full text access to Izvestiia Digital Archive (1917-2010);
  • Access to Polish independent publications (microfiche collection); and
  • Full text access to Russian Social Sciences and Humanities Journals Database (92 titles), which includes journals such as Politicheskie issledovaniia (2000-present).

Sociology:

  • Some of the most complete holdings of Russian, East European, and Eurasian sociological journals in the U.S.;
  • Access to World of children in the USSR: Artek pioneer camp archives 1944-1967 (microfilm holdings). This collection includes series of publications on the life of young people in the USSR and their subculture. Moreover, this unique collection contains government documents, administrative, medical and financial records, transcripts of meetings, statistical reports, letters from Soviet and foreign children, diaries etc.;
  • Holodomor: famine in Ukraine, 1932-1933: from the Central State Archive of Public Organizations, Kiev (microfilm collection). This archival collection contains 158 microfilm reels and includes resolutions, directives and official telegrams from central and local officials, information reports, letters, etc; and
  • Full text access to Russian Social Sciences and Humanities Journals Database (92 titles), which includes journals such as Sotsiologicheskie issledovaniia back to 2000.

Library Science:

  • Full Text Access to Russian Library Science Journals (26 titles);
  • Access to Russian, East European, and Eurasian (REEE) national bibliographic publications;
  • Extensive holdings of REEE library catalogs, including one of North America’ only complete copies of the Russian National Library’s card catalogs for its pre-1998 non-Slavic-language holdings;
  • Access to national languages imprints catalogs in microfiche format (74 imprints catalog) – These catalogs were produced by the National Library of Russia and reflect their holdings;
  • Access to Helsinki University Library’s old hand-written card catalog on microfilm; and
  • Major holdings of REEE periodicals devoted to library and information science, including  what are among the country’s most complete holdings of both the English and Russian versions of Referativnyi zhurnal: informatika.

International Relations:

  • Access to Russian Academy of Sciences Bibliographies INION Database;
  • Full-text access to ISI Emerging Markets;
  • Full-text access to Russian Central Newspapers (well over 70 titles);
  • Full-text access to Russian Regional Newspapers (113 titles);
  • Full-text digital newspaper subscriptions via Library PressDisplay and East View’s Universal Databases, which contain rarely-seen titles from the volatile North Caucasus region; and
  • Full-text access to leading journals in International Relations, such as Mezhdunarodnye protsessy and the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ Mezhdunarodnaia zhizn’ back to the early 2000s.

Business:

  • Access to Business Source Complete;
  • Access to MarketLine, which provides up-to-date information on companies, industries and countries across the world;
  • Access to Mergent online, which provides financial details for well over 25,000 active and inactive companies from around the world;
  • Full text access to ISI Emerging Markets – provides extensive coverage for Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia;
  • Access to Small Business Resource Center, which covers “…all major areas of starting and operating a business including financing, management, marketing, human resources, franchising, accounting and taxes; and
  • Access to full text leading business journals such as the Russian Academy of Sciences’ Obshchestvo i ekonomika and Mirovaia ekonomika i mezhdunarodnye otnosheniia back to 2000.

Law:

  • Access to Russian Law Database;
  • Full-text access to Russian Government Publications (39 titles)
  • Some of the most complete holdings of Russian, East European, and Eurasian law journals in the U.S.;
  • Noted scholar Keith Hitchins’ collections of rare materials pertaining to Hungarian and Romanian law;
  • Access to Russian National Bibliography Database;
  • Full text access to leading law journals such as Gosudarstvo i pravo back to 2000.

History:

  • Full-text access to the digital version of Turkestanskii Sbornik, which provides extensive coverage for researching former Russian/Soviet Central Asia from 1867-1917;
  • Soviet Communist Party archival materials from GARF, RTsKhIDNI, and TsKhSD (454 microfilm reels of finding aids);
  • Holodomor: famine in Ukraine, 1932-1933: from the Central State Archive of Public Organizations, Kiev (microfilm collection). This archival collection contains 158 microfilm reels and includes resolutions, directives and official telegrams from central and local officials, information reports, letters, etc.
  • Perhaps the most complete collection of Russian Imperial provincial newspapers (gubernskie vedomosti) in North America;
  • Unlimited access to some of the most complete holdings of Russian, East European, and Eurasian journals in the U.S.;
  • One of the U.S.’s most extensive print, microfilm, and microfiche collections, including the only fully-cataloged copy of the National Library of Finland’s massive “Russian History and Culture” series;
  • Full-text access to Pravda Digital Archive (1912-2009);
  • Full-text access to Izvestiia Digital Archive (1917-2010);
  • Access to Newspapers from the Russian Revolutionary Era (454 microfilm reels);
  • Yugoslavia: Peoples, States, and Society (microfilm collection) consists of 109 reels, which include a unique set of short monographs, pamphlets, and other materials on the Balkan Wars, World War I  and the South Slavs, interwar Yugoslavia, and World War II;
  • Access to Anti-Soviet newspapers, 1918-1922 (493 newspapers); and
  • Eighteenth Century Russian Publications on microfilm (906 microfilm reels).

Language/Literature/Culture (AATSEEL):

  • Full-text access to Iskusstvo kino Digital Archive;
  • Access to Jewish Theater under Stalinism microfilm collection, which contains archival documents from the Moscow State Jewish Theater (GOSET) and the affiliated Moscow State Jewish Theater School (MGETU). Overall, these collections consist of 857 archival files on 86 microfilm reels;
  • One of the U.S.’s most extensive print, microfilm, and microfiche collections, including the only fully-cataloged copy of the National Library of Finland’s massive “Russian History and Culture” series;
  • Full-text access to Literaturnaia gazeta Digital Archive (1929-2011);
  • Full-text access to Pravda Digital Archive (1912-2009);
  • Full-text access to Izvestiia Digital Archive (1917-2010);
  • Access to Israel Perlstein Czech Fine Press Collection, which contains rare items like the interwar editions of imprints;
  • Full-text access to Russian Social Sciences and Humanities journals Database (92 titles);
  • Full-text access to Central and Eastern European Online Library’s collection of humanities and social sciences journals (1,156 journals); and
  • Largest collection of works relating to the Czech artist Max Švabinský outside the Czech Republic.

Linguistics:

  • One of North America’s only complete copies of the Russian National Library’s card catalogs for its pre-1998 non-Slavic-language holdings, providing bibliographic access to decades of rare publications in over 100 languages of the former Soviet Union;
  • A wealth of bibliographic resources for reviewing linguistics-related publications, including the U.S.’s only current holdings of the Kazakh and Uzbek national bibliographies;
  • An extensive collection of dictionaries from Central Europe acquired by noted scholar Kieth Hitchins; and
  • Full-text access to leading linguistics journals such as Izvestiia RAN: Seriia literatury i iazyka and Voprosy iasykoznaniia back to 2000.

The deadline for applications and grant funding is April 15 and is fast approaching! For further information and to apply, please visit: http://www.reeec.illinois.edu/srl/?utm_source=AHA&utm_medium=calendar&utm_campaign=SRL2014. For more information on SRL, please visit: http://www.reeec.illinois.edu/srl/. For more information on the Slavic Reference Service, please visit: http://www.library.illinois.edu/spx/.

Bethany Wages is a graduate student in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her focus of study is History, and she is currently researching student movements, political violence, and the intelligentsia of late 19th century Russia. She received her B.A. in Honors/History and English Literature in 2014 at Wright State University. 

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